Stratford-Upon-Avon – In the footsteps of Shakespeare

One summer I was bored, I impulsively jumped on a plane to London and took a train to Stratford-Upon-Avon to visit the birthplace of Shakespeare. Don’t ask me why I ended up there of all places, but my fascination of his comedies in general and Much Ado About nothing in special, might have something to do with it.

I spent almost a week in the small, cozy English village, soaking up the atmosphere, admiring the thatched houses and visiting historical buildings, like Shakespeares birthhouse and his new house as well as the house of Anne Hathaway’s parents, where Shakespeare courted his wife-to-be. A week in totall stressless harmony, engulfed in historic poetry. I even ended up having a two hour excistential conversation with a catholic priest at the local church. Quite interesting, especially me being an atheist an all, but that is a story for another time.

Stratford-Upon-Avon: In the footsteps of Shakespeare

One summer I was bored, I impulsively jumped on a plane to London and took a train to Stratford-Upon-Avon to visit the birthplace of Shakespeare. Don’t ask me why I ended up there of all places, but my fascination of his comedies in general and Much Ado About nothing in special, might have something to do with it.

I spent almost a week in the small, cozy English village, soaking up the atmosphere, admiring the thatched houses and visiting historical buildings, like Shakespeares birthhouse and his new house as well as the house of Anne Hathaway’s parents, where Shakespeare courted his wife-to-be. A week in totall stressless harmony, engulfed in historic poetry. I even ended up having a two hour excistential conversation with a catholic priest at the local church. Quite interesting, especially me being an atheist an all, but that is a story for another time.

Stonehenge – a neolithic enigma

I have always been fascinated by history and one year I went to England, more specifically  in the outskirts of Salisbury, to visit one of the world’s most famous creations, Stonehedge.

I set up camp in Salisbury and after a heavy English breakfast at one of the local pubs, I hiked the 13 km to Stonehenge. The first phase of the structure started over 5000 years ago, and continued for centuries to come. It is still a mystery how our anscestors were able to place the massive stones in its characteristic pattern and multiple theories have been made to describe their purpose. Even today we don’t know for sure, but a major theory is that Stonehenge represents an antique observatorium.

Even though the commercialism surrounding the stone structure was a bit of a nuisance, I managed to mentally travel back in time, trying to fathom the origin of this mythical place,